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Category: apps

The Hair of Zoe

Posted in apps, and picture book lesson

Before the break, first graders had fun with the book, The Hair of Zoe Fleefenbacher Goes to School. They sequenced events during the story and made predictions about how what Zoe’s hair would do next. Then at the tables, they created wild hair for Zoe on a bookmark they could take home. During check out, we rotated iPads so they could play a fun crazy salon/barbershop game. 

hair of zoe

Hair of Zoe Fleefenbacher
Review

 Make a Hair of Zoe bookmark2
The Hair of Zoe video
Toca Hair Salon
toca hair salon app

Pre-K ‘Snows’ How to Have Fun

Posted in apps, and picture book lesson

Both Pre-K classes had fun sequencing events in Ehlert’s book, Snowballs, last week in the Jackson Library. After we read the beginning where the author is gathering supplies and the birds are coming out, the students sequenced that part. Then they sequenced the middle where the storyteller creates the mom, dad, son, and daughter. Finally, they put the last events in order: the baby, dog, cat, and bird in the melted snow. At the tables, the kids explored the Starfall Snowman app and we watched the video on the big screen during check out. Explore more of Lois Ehlert’s fantastic book creations on the site at the bottom of this post!

snowballs

 

Snowball book by Ehlert
review

Snowball Story Safeshare
Starfall Snowman app
Lois Ehlert site
 

Lucia La Luchadora

Posted in apps, picture book lesson, and reading skills

Second graders had fun in the Jackson Library today with Luca la Luchadora. We read the story about how a little girl’s abuela encourages her to stand up to playground bullying by showing her a vintage luchadora costume and telling her about the legacy of the luchadora’s power. When Lucia wears the costume, she not only stands up to bullies but also rescues Coco the puppy when he is stuck on the slide. By the end of the story, she realizes that she doesn’t need a mask or costume to stand up for herself. We identified causes and effects in the story and created a Luchadora or Nino mask from Nino Wrestles the World. At the tables, they chose from either a Lucia mask or a Nino mask and decorated it. They played a fun luchadora mask game on the iPads. Thanks to Shawne Briggs, Sheffield Primary Librarian  in Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD, for ideas for this lesson. Check out her Wrangler Library tweets! 

Lucia la Luchadora

 

 

Curriculum Guide

Hou Chronicle Author Interview

Lucia luchadora mask – drawing attempt by AK

review

lucha cause efe

author Twitter page

illustrator Twitter page

Crazy Masks app

crazy masks

nino

Nino Activities

Masks

Niño mask

author tweet

Monster Trucks!

Posted in apps, holiday, and picture book lesson

Monster trucks, no literally, monsters driving trucks, invaded the library last week! We read Joy Keller’s fun book, Monster Trucks, and matched the specific monster with its truck: the ogre was in charge of the wrecking ball, the werewolf used the digging machine to dig up prehistoric bones, and the yeti ran the snowplow. The kids love this book! At the tables, they controlled their own trucks to build a house of their choosing with Sago Mini Trucks and Diggers. During check out, we watched Jon Scieszka’s Smash! Crash! 

review

author page

illustrator page

review

monster trucks

 

comment from author

Texting Story with The Widow’s Broom

Posted in apps, holiday, picture book lesson, and TTESS 1819

Fifth graders “gathered around the fire, where embers of a dying flame glowed upon the hearth” (to quote from our story) in the Jackson Library this week. They huddled around the imaginary fire to hear a spooky story that is also a mystery to solve, The Widow’s Broom by Chris van Allsburg. We tacked STAAR strategies like using context clues, making inferences, and mapping the broom’s character traits. At the tables, the kids had a choice to use Texting Story to re-create a text message ‘conversation’ between two of the characters or to use Toontastic to animate one section of the story. They had fun and were so creative!

texting story wb

Teacher’s Guide for The Widow’s Broom

Widows Broom II questions

TEK 6: Reading Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction: Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

A) describe the incidents that advance the story or novel, explaining how each incident gives rise to foreshadow future events

B) explain the roles and functions of characters in various plots, including their relationships and conflicts

WB

 

 

Can You Stack the Cats?

Posted in apps

Can you stack the cats? Pre-K can! Both classes had fun with this Susie Ghahremani (@boygirlparty) book in the Jackson Library! I like how the cats want to be stacked in small groups so they don’t tumble- then the kids are adding 3 cats + 3 cats instead of 6 because what happens with 6 every time…? The story is perfect for Pre-K and the illustrations are delightful!  Fun!

stack the cats
Abrams reviews

Stack the Cats

stack up app
Step by Step stack up app

Monster Trouble

Posted in apps, and reading skills

Second graders enjoyed a fun read aloud in the Jackson Library last week titled Monster Trouble by Lane Fredrickson and illustrated by Michael Robertson. We follow Winifred Schnitzel, a little girl who is not easily frightened but is annoyed by monsters interrupting her sleep. She devises several plans to deter them with one finally succeeding in the end. Great opportunities abound for students to use context and picture clues to determine the meaning of unknown words in this story. I like how the author created Winifred full of gumption and innovation and I like how the illustrator gives each monster personality and conveys a myriad of emotions Winifred has when dealing with her annoying visitors. 

Here Wee Read Review
Click for Here Wee Read Review

m trouble pics

At the tables during check out, the kids enjoyed the interactive read aloud app, Even Monsters Get Sick.

Even Monsters Get Sick app

 

Michael Robertson illustration
Michael Robertson RT

There Was an Old Monster

Posted in apps, and holiday

Pre-K had fun today with the Emberley family story, There Was an Old Monster. First we read the story. Then the kids came and put the animals in the monster’s stomach in the order that he ate them. They were surprised at the end when a big neon lion came and ate the monster! We listened to Rebecca Emberley sing the fun song and we did the If You’re a Monster and You Know It dance. At the tables, the kids played with Sago Mini Monsters and Ed Emberley’s Go Away Big Green Monster apps. I am disappointed that the GABGM app is no longer available in the US – I still had it on my iPads from last year. It looks like now it is only available in the Romania iTunes store. Maybe they’ll add it back soon! Before we left, we sang Ms. Patterson’s class version of If You’re a Monster and You Know It. (video below)

pk monster fun

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Go Formative

Posted in apps, holiday, technology, and TTESS 1819

Fourth graders came to the library this week to explore different formative assessments. Yesterday we tried Pear Deck but it isn’t ideal for the library in that each student has to log in to his/her Google account and we have to share iPads (work in pairs). So today we tried GoFormative and loved it! I gave each pair of students a Pokemon character’s name on a card and that was their login. Then I gave them all the same password. I set up the class in advance on the site and I took screenshots of a Google Slides presentation I had ready about spooky poems. Then I entered the questions in GoFormative. I like all of the media possibilities- you can import a pdf, video, ask them to draw something on the screen, use multiple choice, audio, etc. I also like how the students can answer at their own pace. In the settings, I marked the choice for ‘after student submits.’ It will be interesting to see how this lesson goes the rest of this week!

go formative

 

Reading Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry:  Students make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain how the structural elements of poetry (e.g., rhyme, meter, stanzas, line breaks) relate to form) (e.g. lyrical poetry, free verse).

 

assign share

Choose the assessment you want them to take (in background screen here) and then choose your class (Jackson Library).

step3

In optional settings, choose ‘return scores’= after student submits.

step2

Now give the students a QR code or bookmark the Go Formative login screen. Then they are ready to login and click their assignment.

SAMPLE STUDENT LOGIN CARD

charizard

 

@charizard    

library

stu login

Go Formative pix

Spooky Poems

GoFormative stu ans

Fright School!

Posted in apps, holiday, picture book lesson, and reading skills

Last week in the Jackson Library, first graders had fun with a new spooky story, Fright School, by Janet Lawler. There are excellent vocabulary words in the story, so I created an interactive poster with words and corresponding pictures. We used context and the fun illustrations to determine the meanings of the words. During check out, we had fun with Amanda Noll’s I Need My Monster interactive storybook app and no spooky library lesson would be complete without doing The Monster Shuffle dance at the end!

words studied: scolds, seeping, relish, foul, clutch, quake, peer

 

 Fright School

Author site, video, quiz

Fright School lesson

I Need My Monster book app

Janet Lawler’s site

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