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Tag: fifth grade

Boo Haikus! 2021

Posted in displays and deco, fifth grade, holiday, how to, picture book lesson, poetry, technology, and writing

Last week, in the Jackson Library, fifth graders had fun writing spooky haikus! This idea is from the book, Boo! Haiku. To get our brains warmed up, I showed the kids some student samples from a couple of years ago and then had them draw a spooky scene.  Thinking about how to describe the scene helped the kids to get ideas for their haiku. The bilingual classes chose to write in English or Spanish. Other helpful tips:  scatter SPOOKY words1spookywords2 on the tables as vocabulary enhancers, don’t ‘require’ use of the form/template- many kids wanted to write their poem rough draft right next to their drawing… Check out their spoooky creations! 

boo haiku
Review

5th grade boo haikus 2021

Eng. stu sheet
Student sheet- Eng.

MODIFY LESSON: SPOOKY words1

spookywords2

 

Stu Sheet Spanish
Stu Sheet Spanish

Spa haiku sample

 

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stu boo haikus 2021
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More books by Deanna Caswell
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Note on how to embed a Google Doc popout:
Share your Google Doc.
Go to the three dots at the top.
Choose ‘open in new window’- this used to be called ‘pop out’
open goo doc in new window
Then choose: embed item
choose pop out
Copy the embed code URL
embed code
Change the ‘height’ to a larger number so more of the document can be viewed at once:
I think I made the height of this one 3000

Tracking a Hurricane

Posted in current events, fifth grade, picture book lesson, and science

Fifth graders learn how to track a hurricane after reading A Storm Called Katrina. We discussed Louis Armstrong and listened to his cornet skills.  I showed them some elephant ear plants and we discussed why we are reading this story now and not in January. We talked about coordinates and mapped out Katrina’s path.  The author’s use of imagery and foreshadowing was the reading focus of the lesson. We discussed what a levee is and showed photos of a levee break. The kids turned and talked with each other at their tables about the one thing they would grab if their home was about to flood. The author is very good at making the reader empathize with Louis and his family. You could tell the kids were really thinking about what the people in Louisiana had to endure and the resilience of the parishes rebuilding after every disaster. 

 

 

storm called katrina book
Review

photos Katrina lesson

Reading TEKS

elephant ear plants

discussion

 

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Tracking  a Hurricane

Teacher’s Guide

Read Aloud on Safeshare

Hurricane Tracking 

Track that Hurricane

Hurricane Tracking clearer

NOAA chart – use for copy center

Hurricanes now 2019

Aim a Hurricane game

Exploring The Garden of Abdul Gasazi

Posted in fifth grade, picture book lesson, and reading skills

This week in the Jackson Library, fifth graders explored the fascinating picture book, The Garden of Abdul Gasazi.  First, we discussed topiaries and looked at pictures.  Then we discussed foreshadowing and prepared ourselves to find how Van Allsburg uses the literary technique in his book.  During the story, we completed the puzzle and discussed the vocabulary words.  During check out, the kids rotated on the computers to play a Quizdini game about the book. After the story, the kids had to decide if the magician tricked Alan or if he really knew magic. It looks like FOX/Disney might be adapting the book into a movie version soon!

Garden Abdul cover
Review
Gasazi puzzle
puzzle

Gasazi puzzle key

5th Gasazi lesson

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Garden of Abdul Gasazi Safeshare video 
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Houghton Mifflin Teacher’s Guide
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Quizdini
game

 

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CVA
Frequently Asked Questions

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news article
click to find out more

 

Our ‘Expert’ Alphabet Books

Posted in nonfiction lesson, picture book lesson, and writing

In the fall, fifth graders had fun sharing their ‘expert knowledge’ on different topics by creating an alphabet book. Since I started taking guitar lessons on Zoom last July, I created a sample ‘book’ to use as a model and then also shared the book, Attack! Boss! Cheat Code! A Gamer’s Alphabet by Chris Barton. They had fun and we all learned so much!

Based on the book:

attack boss cheat code
click to go to Chris Barton’s site

 

Samples

Student Book Excerpts
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Dear Basketball

Posted in fifth grade, fourth grade, third grade, and writing

February of this year, we read Kobe Bryant’s Dear Basketball poem (we used MrsBlewettELA’s TPT Questions) and watched the Oscar-winning short animated movie. Then, third through fifth grades wrote a “love letter” to SOMETHING they love. Check out their awesome work! Then, watch our video and check out the three-pointers!

Kobe Bryant's Dear Basketball
poem

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MrsBlewettELA’s TPT Dear Basketball Poem and Questions

MrsBlewett ELA TPT

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Dear Basketball short
Oscar-winning short

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Student Writing

 

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Student Three-Pointers

This idea came from Mr. Bonner! Check out his site: Bonnerville

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Dear BB collage

Harlem Globetrotters

Harlem GT

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Bonnerville

kobe quote

2020 Quotable Quotes, Assoc. Press

“We are all Lakers today.” — Los Angeles Clippers coach Doc Rivers, in a remark to reporters after the death of Kobe Bryant, Orlando, Fla., Jan. 26

Studying the Impact of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Posted in character education, fifth grade, holiday, picture book lesson, Seesaw, and Social Studies

Last week in the Jackson Library, fifth graders listened to the read aloud, Martin’s Big Words, and we discussed the impact those words had on America. Then they used Kally Miller’s Seesaw activity and the dates in the back of the book to sequence the major events in Dr. King’s life on a timeline. Finally, they wrote their own ‘I Have a Dream’ excerpts to convey ways they want the world to improve. 

MLK Martin's Big Words lesson

Seesaw activ Make a MLK Jr. timeline

More of Kally Miller’s Seesaw activities here

ANSWER KEY

key

I HAVE A DREAM SHORTENED POEM TEMPLATE

I Have a Dream Poem Template - short
short template

 

pollution article 2021
article, Jan. 2021

Student Poems
5th I Have a Dream poems
Nancy W comment

Using Active Voice: A Jeff Anderson Lesson

Posted in bilingual, fifth grade, picture book lesson, Seesaw, and writing

Today in the Jackson Library, fifth graders practiced using active voice during writing. First, we read Chall’s Up North at the Cabin. During the story, I pointed out the author’s use of active voice, personification, and imagery. I used Jeff Anderson’s Patterns of Power book, lesson 6.5. Then the kids used a Seesaw template I created to sort sentences from the story by active or passive voice. After that, I gave them dry erase boards and they wrote an active voice sentence about the school camping trip. As you can see, it rained during most of camp this year! 

active voice

up north at the cabin book

Jeff Anderson – Patterns of Power- 6.5 What Do Verbs Do? Finding Your Active Voice 

“The sunshine sits in my lap…”

“The river spills over rocks and whispers to me…”

“The [boat’s] motor sputters softly, waiting…”

“The boat roars forward…”

“blood thumps through my head…”

“when frosted windows cloud the sun”

 

seesaw

 

 

active voice

Puddles of ink stained the blank paper.

Little dots of paint sketch a beautiful dog.

I just ordered the bilingual edition of the book but it hasn’t shipped yet, so I talked to our bilingual team leader and we guessed at how to translate this lesson for the bilingual kids: 

El libro fue liedo por Juan.

Juan lee el libro.

Patterns of Power

5th shearman

5th kuw

Burkhead's class

Inferences with Abdul Gasazi

Posted in fifth grade, picture book lesson, and technology

This week in the Jackson Library, fifth graders used text evidence to support their inferences after reading The Garden of Abdul Gasazi. I created a Seesaw template for them to use and they worked in pairs to match the text evidence to the inference in the story. We discussed the author’s use of foreshadowing and the items in the Anchorage District text evidence chart below. 

5th grade lesson Garden of Abdul

inferences and evidence

gardne1

Text Evidence Chart from Anchorage District

Text Dependent Questions Answers
Reread page 398. What evidence from the text can you cite to defend the idea that Alan takes pet-sitting Fritz seriously? He won’t let Fritz out of his sightHe keeps Fritz from chewing furniture
Reread the last sentence on page 398 when Alan hides his hat under his shirt. This is an example of foreshadowing. Where in the story does Alan’s hat reoccur?

Pg 408- the duck steals Alan’s hat

Pg 412- Fritz has the hat when he is waiting for Alan on the porch

Reread page 400. Based on the first paragraph, how can you tell that Alan has no control over Fritz?

Fritz bites Alan

Frtiz drags him out of the houseFritz leads him across the bridge

On page 400, the author uses all capital letters on the sign. Why do you think the author did this? How would the mood be different if the author did not do this? Capital letters often denote yelling or intense feelings or emotions.
Chris Van Allsburg wants the reader to notice that Fritz is out of control. What words or phrases on page 400 does the author use to portray Fritz in this light?

Fritz has to be dragged out of the house

Fritz gives a tremendous tugFritz snaps out of his collar

Fritz bolts straight ahead

How is the author using the illustrations and word choice to create suspense in this story?  (Pg. 402)

Gasazi’s house is dark and castle-like

Lots of shadows used

Capital letters used

The pages all end on a cliffhanger or leading sentence

In the second paragraph, Gasazi states that he “detests” dogs. Using contextual clues what do you think “detest” means?  (Pg. 406)

Gasazi lists all the bad things that dogs doHe uses all capital letters on his warning sign

He bellows “I TURN THEM INTO DUCKS!”

Why is Alan concerned that Mr. Gasazi might have captured Fritz?  (Pg. 400)

The threatening sign

Alan’s knowledge of Fritz’s misbehaviorThe knowledge that Fritz had gone into the forbidden area

Reread pages 404-405. What details does that author use to make Mr. Gasazi seem frightening and mysterious?

The house is dark and largeThe door opens before Alan knocks

Mr. Gasazi stands in the shadows

Reread pages 400-406. How does the author make sure that the reader knows that Gasazi  really does not like dogs?

Gasazi’s voice sounds like a growl

The author writes Gasazi saying “I turn them into ducks!”  in capital letters.

He states that he “detests dogs”

The threatening sign

At the beginning of the story we learn that Alan takes pet sitting seriously. What other evidence from the story portrays Alan as a responsible person. Cite evidence from the text to support your answer.

He is politeHe follows Fritz into the garden although he is scared

He admits to Ms Hester that he lost Fritz

Reread page 408. What textual clues are there that lead you to believe that Alan really believe Fritz turns into a duck?

Alan begs Gasazi to turn Fritz back into a dog (406)

Alan tells the duck that he “hasn’t changed much” after the duck bites him (408)

The duck steals Alan’s hat- a favorite thing of Fritz’s (408)

Is Ms. Hester angry at Alan? Use clues from the text and illustrations to support your position. (Pg. 410)

Ms Hester tries to hide a smile

She reassures Alan that Gasazi was just playing tricks

The illustrations depict Ms Hester as comforting Alan

Why do you think that Chris Van Allsburg choose to end the story with Fritz having Alan’s hat?  (Pg. 412) To add to the mystery of the story; ties into the beginning of the story and the foreshadowing of the hat

 

Garden of Abdul Gasazi- After the Story Questions

  • Imagine that Alan goes back to talk to Mr. Gasazi about the incident. How will the magician react? Will they become friends? Describe their continuing adventures in writing.
  • Imagine that Fritz didn’t come back to Miss Hester’s house. What would Alan have done? Or imagine that Fritz did come back but he remained a duck. How would Alan have explained that to Miss Hester?

quizdini

Garden of Abdul Gasazi Safeshare video 

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