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Tag: fifth grade

Inferences with Abdul Gasazi

Posted in fifth grade, picture book lesson, and technology

This week in the Jackson Library, fifth graders used text evidence to support their inferences after reading The Garden of Abdul Gasazi. I created a Seesaw template for them to use and they worked in pairs to match the text evidence to the inference in the story. We discussed the author’s use of foreshadowing and the items in the Anchorage District text evidence chart below. 

5th grade lesson Garden of Abdul

inferences and evidence

gardne1

Text Evidence Chart from Anchorage District

Text Dependent Questions Answers
Reread page 398. What evidence from the text can you cite to defend the idea that Alan takes pet-sitting Fritz seriously? He won’t let Fritz out of his sightHe keeps Fritz from chewing furniture
Reread the last sentence on page 398 when Alan hides his hat under his shirt. This is an example of foreshadowing. Where in the story does Alan’s hat reoccur?

Pg 408- the duck steals Alan’s hat

Pg 412- Fritz has the hat when he is waiting for Alan on the porch

Reread page 400. Based on the first paragraph, how can you tell that Alan has no control over Fritz?

Fritz bites Alan

Frtiz drags him out of the houseFritz leads him across the bridge

On page 400, the author uses all capital letters on the sign. Why do you think the author did this? How would the mood be different if the author did not do this? Capital letters often denote yelling or intense feelings or emotions.
Chris Van Allsburg wants the reader to notice that Fritz is out of control. What words or phrases on page 400 does the author use to portray Fritz in this light?

Fritz has to be dragged out of the house

Fritz gives a tremendous tugFritz snaps out of his collar

Fritz bolts straight ahead

How is the author using the illustrations and word choice to create suspense in this story?  (Pg. 402)

Gasazi’s house is dark and castle-like

Lots of shadows used

Capital letters used

The pages all end on a cliffhanger or leading sentence

In the second paragraph, Gasazi states that he “detests” dogs. Using contextual clues what do you think “detest” means?  (Pg. 406)

Gasazi lists all the bad things that dogs doHe uses all capital letters on his warning sign

He bellows “I TURN THEM INTO DUCKS!”

Why is Alan concerned that Mr. Gasazi might have captured Fritz?  (Pg. 400)

The threatening sign

Alan’s knowledge of Fritz’s misbehaviorThe knowledge that Fritz had gone into the forbidden area

Reread pages 404-405. What details does that author use to make Mr. Gasazi seem frightening and mysterious?

The house is dark and largeThe door opens before Alan knocks

Mr. Gasazi stands in the shadows

Reread pages 400-406. How does the author make sure that the reader knows that Gasazi  really does not like dogs?

Gasazi’s voice sounds like a growl

The author writes Gasazi saying “I turn them into ducks!”  in capital letters.

He states that he “detests dogs”

The threatening sign

At the beginning of the story we learn that Alan takes pet sitting seriously. What other evidence from the story portrays Alan as a responsible person. Cite evidence from the text to support your answer.

He is politeHe follows Fritz into the garden although he is scared

He admits to Ms Hester that he lost Fritz

Reread page 408. What textual clues are there that lead you to believe that Alan really believe Fritz turns into a duck?

Alan begs Gasazi to turn Fritz back into a dog (406)

Alan tells the duck that he “hasn’t changed much” after the duck bites him (408)

The duck steals Alan’s hat- a favorite thing of Fritz’s (408)

Is Ms. Hester angry at Alan? Use clues from the text and illustrations to support your position. (Pg. 410)

Ms Hester tries to hide a smile

She reassures Alan that Gasazi was just playing tricks

The illustrations depict Ms Hester as comforting Alan

Why do you think that Chris Van Allsburg choose to end the story with Fritz having Alan’s hat?  (Pg. 412) To add to the mystery of the story; ties into the beginning of the story and the foreshadowing of the hat

 

Garden of Abdul Gasazi- After the Story Questions

  • Imagine that Alan goes back to talk to Mr. Gasazi about the incident. How will the magician react? Will they become friends? Describe their continuing adventures in writing.
  • Imagine that Fritz didn’t come back to Miss Hester’s house. What would Alan have done? Or imagine that Fritz did come back but he remained a duck. How would Alan have explained that to Miss Hester?

quizdini

Garden of Abdul Gasazi Safeshare video 

4th Grade Catapults

Posted in fifth grade, fourth grade, and STEM

Fourth and fifth graders problem-solved as they constructed catapults in the Jackson Library last week and this week. The groups were all given 20 popsicle sticks, 7 thick rubber bands, a plastic spoon, a pom pom, and these instructions. They were not required to use the instruction sheet; it was just a guide. After about 12 minutes, they tested their catapult (3 tries), and then went to the tables to redesign for about 5 more minutes. Finally, they launched their catapults again. It was interesting to see the improvements they made the second time around!

Buggy and Buddy Catapult Instructions

catapults
Catapult Computer Station 
fraction fling
garden gnomes game
5 catapults

The Wreck of the Zephyr

Posted in assessment, fifth grade, picture book lesson, reading skills, and TTESS 1819

Fifth grade solved a mystery last week in the Jackson Library! As we read Chris van Allsburg’s The Wreck of the Zephyr, they used inference skills to determine what parts of the boat the story referenced when the water rushed against the hull, the wind whistled in the rigging, and the boom hit the boy in the head during the storm. I gave them a boat diagram to label and then we compared it with a real sailboat diagram after the story. They used context clues to determine the meaning of words like dock and ominous and they connected the theme of the story to “pride goes before a fall and a haughty spirit before destruction.” After reading the story, we took a Quizziz quiz to assess their learning! 

Wreck of the Zephyr

 

Reading Between the Lines with Chris Van Allsburg

Brilliant Star Inference Chart

zephyr stu sheet

zephyr

boat diagram stu-

Parts of a Sailboat Diagram

Quizizz

 

Fifth Grade Analyzes a Biography

Posted in fifth grade, technology, and TTESS 1819

Last week in the Jackson Library, fifth graders analyzed a biography about the pioneer of hip hop music, DJ Kool Herc. After answering STAAR-formatted questions that explored verifiable facts, inferences about finances, and how we can tell Kool Herc was attentive to his audience within the book When The Beat Was Born, the kids used an interactive Google Doodle game, The 44th Anniversary of Hip Hop, to mix their own record using actual instrumental samples from the 70s. Awesome! 

DJ Kool Herc When the Beat was Born
Google Doodle

Critical Reading: Nonfiction w 3rd and 5th

Posted in fifth grade, nonfiction lesson, reading skills, third grade, and TTESS 1819

Third and fifth graders use technology to interact with nonfiction magazine articles. They use iOS markup tools to show text evidence when answering critical reading skills questions like analyzing captions, making inferences, and using context clues to identify unknown words.  

 

3rd owls – National Geographic Kids
3rd TEK 13A: Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text: Stu must analyze, make inferences, and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding.
A) identify details that support main ideas
B) draw conclusions from facts presented and support with textual evidence
C) identify explicit cause and effect relationships among ideas in the text
D) use text features to locate information and verify predictions about contents of text
owl article  Questions
owl article NGK key
3rd rdg nonfiction
5th Frauds/Hoaxes: Frank Abagnale
5th 11: Reading Comprehension of Informational/Expository Text: Students make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
A) summarize the main idea and supporting details in the text
B) determine the facts in text and verify
D) use text features and graphics to gain an overview of contents and locate information
E) make logical connections between ideas within a text
5th nonfiction
Noah is amazed by how Frank Abagnale duped his employers for over 20 years!
frauds and hoaxes questions– STAAR-Like

frauds and hoaxes KEY

 

edumosis

killion

Texting Story with The Widow’s Broom

Posted in apps, fifth grade, holiday, picture book lesson, and TTESS 1819

Fifth graders “gathered around the fire, where embers of a dying flame glowed upon the hearth” (to quote from our story) in the Jackson Library this week. They huddled around the imaginary fire to hear a spooky story that is also a mystery to solve, The Widow’s Broom by Chris van Allsburg. We tacked STAAR strategies like using context clues, making inferences, and mapping the broom’s character traits. At the tables, the kids had a choice to use Texting Story to re-create a text message ‘conversation’ between two of the characters or to use Toontastic to animate one section of the story. They had fun and were so creative!

texting story wb

Teacher’s Guide for The Widow’s Broom

Widows Broom II questions

TEK 6: Reading Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction: Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

A) describe the incidents that advance the story or novel, explaining how each incident gives rise to foreshadow future events

B) explain the roles and functions of characters in various plots, including their relationships and conflicts

WB

 

 

Columbus Day Poem Analysis with 5th

Posted in fifth grade, holiday, poetry, reading skills, technology, and TTESS 1819

This week in the Jackson Elementary Library, we analyzed a Columbus Poem by Anne Wynne. We discussed important vocabulary words in advance as well as the meaning of a stanza and how to determine rhyming patterns. After the discussion, the kids played a Quizizz about the content. Half of the kids completed Columbus Brainpop activities at the computer station while the other half took their quiz. Then we switched groups and the other half took their quiz. I love how customizable Quizizz is! I turned off the ‘earn points for speed’ setting so they would take their time and I turned on the ‘read aloud’ feature in the settings and provided headphones to meet certain students’ accommodations for language, etc. This lesson was mildly adapted from Nancy Jo Lambert‘s 2012 Columbus Day Poetry lesson on her site. She is awesome! The kids for the most part love Quizizz and thought it was even better than Kahoot! I like the descriptive data it provides. You can also customize the language setting (Spanish, etc.)

Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry:  Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Student are expected to analyze how poetry uses sound effects (e.g., alliteration, internal rhyme, onomatopoeia, rhyme scheme) to reinforce meaning in poems.

Annette Wynne Poem

quizizz
Columbus p 5

Reports

report

data

Quizizz report data

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