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Category: bilingual

The Wonky Donkey and Seesaw

Posted in bilingual, first grade, picture book lesson, technology, and TTESS 1819

Last week, I created my first Seesaw activity! (link below) After reading The Wonky Donkey and singing the song, the first graders had to think of a NEW flaw for the donkey. They used Seesaw in pairs to draw their wonkier donkey and they used the microphone to tell about its new flaw. They had a blast!

wonky donkey lessoh

seesaw

 

 

 

 

 

 

wonky donkey alina celester

Lucia la Luchadora

Posted in bilingual, picture book lesson, reading skills, second grade, social-emotional learning, and writing

One book we are reading to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month in the Jackson Library is Lucia la Luchadora by Cynthia Leonor Garza. Last week, the second graders identified causes and effects in the story. Since the boys teased Lucia, she asked her abuela for help. When she wore the luchadora costume and mask, she had the courage to rescue Coco from the top of the slide. We discussed stereotypes and assumptions people make about appearances and how to overcome those with inner confidence and strength. After the story, the kids wrote a sentence about what some people perceive as a limitation, and then wrote what they CAN do despite that perception. This great idea is from Ms. Rodrigo’s Twitter feed! Finally, they colored their own Nino (from Yuyi Morales’ Nino Wrestles the World book) or Lucia la Luchadora (mask drawn by me) to take home to finish. 

review

Curriculum Guide

Hou Chronicle Author Interview

Lucia luchadora mask – drawing attempt by AK

Niño mask

Nino Activities

Lucia la Luchadora sentence strip I can activity

 

bil Lucia La Luchadora sentences

Lesson idea from Ms. Rodrigo’s Twitter Feed

sent strip 1

Check out Cynthia Leonor Garza’s new book about Lucia!

 

Whose Feet?

Posted in apps, bilingual, nonfiction lesson, and Pre-K

Before STAAR week, Pre-K had fun guessing Whose Feet? in the Jackson Library. After reading My Eyes are Big and Red, the kids guessed what animal on which the story was based. Then they had to guess what animals were on the poster just based on the feet. At the tables, they played the Whose Feet? game on the app, colored the feet of Jan Brett animals, and  listened to the fun Maple Leaf songs.

whose feet

Whose Feet?
color the feet

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